MAKING AFRICA AT HIGH MUSEUM OF ARTS ATLANTA [REVIEW] Wednesday 15 November, 2017

 When you think of Africa what are some of your first thoughts? Seriously ask yourself that question? Do you think of it as a place of creativity and artistic expression? Honestly I think in America, Africa is not represented properly well at all. Its always shown in negative aspects – but honestly its a mecca of beauty and creativitiy. The fashion trend for the past year has been prevalent of people rocking African prints and garb lately, but even with that…there is still more to Africa. I was invited to explore the new Making Africa, which is currently at the High Musuem of Art and I couldn’t wait to see how this exhibit was presented. 

“Making Africa” is a collaborative project led by Vitra Design Museum Curator Amelie Klein along with Consulting Curator and Haus der Kunst Director Okwui Enwezor, with support from a large board of curatorial advisors, based primarily in Africa. Exhibition offers a fresh look at African design through sculpture, prints, fashion, furniture, film and photography by more than 120 artists from 22 countries

“Making Africa” presents the continent as a hub of experimentation generating innovative design approaches and solutions with worldwide elevance and as a driving force for reframing discussions on design possibilities and applications in the new millennium.

Powerful African Quote

Beautiful African art illustration

This is larger than it appears. This can probably fit two adults on this hand woven basket swing

The poster boy currently plaster in front of High Museum of Arts

Kenyan artist Cyrus Kabiru’s 2012 “C-Stunner” glasses, made of found materials, offer a compelling metaphor for the shift in perspective explored in this section.

Reminds me of African Futurism. In this exhibit there are lots of art work and images of past, present but a great deal of futuristic expressions as well. It was beautiful to see artwork of an African future. I feel like I haven’t seen many futuristic shows and movies that showcases an African future. Ok I take it back…Marvel’s Black Panther is supposed to explore that. Until then, looking at some Afro-futuristic work here was amazing!

At this exhibit there are so many high fashion African design concepts!

A chair made of only guns and ammo

Water Bottle sandals

Now this one hurt me. I seen this and initally I was confused. I thought what part of flat water bottles with string on it is art? Then I realized…these are sandals. This is the Africa most people think of. The famine, the dispare, the poverty and the lack of resources. So much of a lack of resources that many in certain parts of African people cannot afford shoes. They make shoes out of water bottles. I literally kind of teared up when I figured it out. I can’t even imagine the poverty of not having anything but water bottles and string to make shoes out of. Can you imagine? Privledge is every shoe I owe, every shoe you own.

Drum Magazine Vintage Covers from the 60s.

DRUM Magazine, was the first black lifestyle magazine in Africa created in 1951. This magazine looks slighly similar to the America black lifestyle magazine called EBONY Magazine.

I love this Albino model. Albinoism is the lack of pigmentation that is usually a genetic deformity in Africans and African Americans. Many people think of Africans as dark people, but the truth is the contintent of people have an array of colors and shades, including albinoid people. I love this so much because the model is stunning and her hue is what makes her beautiful. The white cloth on her porcelain skin, but yet you can still see her strong African features are just stunning.

You all know I am an avid traveling epseically internatially…but I am on a mission. I will be manifesting and putting into the universe I will visit Africa in 2018. Visiting Making Africa sealed the deal for me. I need to see the beauty in the flesh!

Beautiful modern African Model and creative African print photography

I loved visiting this exhibit. I know I am African American, and I will be honest I still lack knowledge of a modern Africa. I promise after exploring Making Africa, I am more enlighten on the modern country, got to see so many creative works from the amazing African designers and I feel more connected to what Africa is really made of. We have to see creativity is across the globe. Creative in fashion, tech, entertainment, craftmanship and more. Our minds have to expand from what we were told about the largest continent on this planet. Think about it, this large planet is fill with people who are highly creative and yet we barely get to see their work. Everything is really all about America and how great we are here. We can’t be so pompous as Americans to think we are the inventors of some of the best work out currently. I dont think so. Africa has plenty of jaw-dropping artwork and pieces and I am sure if displayed in the mainstream it would flourish more here. We will see if African influences will get the recognition it deserves here but until then Making Africa is a great exhibit for African artistry. Making Africa showed me Africa is made in beauty and lots of it!

The High Museum of Art is the first venue in the United States to present this major touring exhibition, which offers a fresh look at African design through a myriad of diverse works by more than 120 artists. Ranging from playful to provocative to political, the works include sculpture, prints, fashion, furniture, film, photography, apps, maps, digital comics, and more.

“Making Africa: A Continent of Contemporary Design”
Through Jan. 7. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays and Saturdays; 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Fridays; noon-5 p.m. Sundays. $14.50, ages 6 and above; free for children 5 and younger and members. High Museum of Art, 1280 Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta. 404-733-4444, www.high.org.

About the Blogger - Kiwi the Beauty


I am a not so typical, unstereotypical 20something year old lady who is trying to make my mark on this planet. This blog has many aspect through my visual perspective through photos, words & wittiness. I am highly creative, I love to socialize, and also a social media butterfly. I don’t follow trends, I create them.

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